Evergreens

  1. Austrian Pine<br>Pinus nigra: The Austrian Pine is a dependable pine for Pacific Northwest. It is densely pyramidal when young but matures to be a dome shaped tree with dense spreading branches. Austrian pines can be used as screening trees but they do not tolerate shearing.
  2. Deodora Cedar<br>Cedrus deodora: The Deodar Cedar has a very graceful habit that can be quite striking in the landscape. It is grown easily in our mild northwest climate. Branches of the Deodar are pendulous and the central leader often droops. It has dense evergreen needles that grow in tufts or whorls on the branches. Needles have a unique bright green to a bluish tint.
  3. Douglas Fir<br>Pseudotsuga menziesii: The Douglas fir is a dense evergreen native to our area. It has a strong pyramidal shape when young and has a tendency to limb itself up as it matures. Its size will be difficult to control in urban landscapes so it is best to have adequate space for this large native tree. Needles are soft and occasionally have a bluish tint.
  4. Elegans Japanese Cedar<br>Cryptomeria Elegans ‘elegans japanese cedar’: Cryptomeria is a selection with juvenile foliage, which is more needle-like and softer, hence the common name plume cedar. The foliage is green in summer and with the onset of cold weather turns a mahogany, plum in the late autumn and winter. It is the perfect backdrop to witchhazels, and red and yellow stemmed cornus. As a young plant is excellent in containers, particularly larger containers planted for winter. The soft texture combines well with other conifers that might be more stiff in appearance also good with Japanese maples. This cultivar was introduced from Japan in the mid 1800s.
  5. Frasier Fir<br>Abies fraseri: The Fraser fir is a nice ornamental evergreen for the landscape. It has the classic evergreen look with its dark green needles and layered branching. The Fraser fir is a popular choice at Christmas. It is best in full sun and it prefers a well drained soil. This tree grows in a pyramidal form. The needles are dark green above with silvery-white on the underside.
  6. Giant Sequoia<br>Sequoiadendron giganteum: The Giant Sequoia is an impressive addition to any landscape. It grows to magnificent heights and gains enormous trunk girth. A large landscape is necessary because size will be difficult to control. The giant sequoia is extremely long lived and is highly regarded as one of the most majestic trees.
  7. Golden Cedar<br>Thuja plicata \'aurea\': The golden cedar is a variegated type of the western red cedar. It has bands of golden yellow within the green foliage. The golden yellow color is more prominent in the new growth, which occurs in early to mid summer. The golden cedar works well as a landscape accent or as a screening tree. It can also be sheared into hedge form.
  8. Grand Fir<br>‘abies grandis’: The grand fir is one of the tallest firs, reaching heights of 300 feet. It is easily distinguished from other Pacific Northwest firs by its sprays of lustrous needles in two distinct rows. They are usually horizontally spread so that both the upper and lower sides of the branches are clearly visible. The needles are 1 to 1 1/2 inches long with glossy dark green tops and two highly visible white lines of stomata on the undersides. The pollen strobili are yellowish and the cones are yellowish-green to green, cylindrical, erect, 2 to 4 inches long, occur high in the crowns and dissipate in the fall to release their seeds. The bark is grayish-brown, usually with white mottles, smooth with resin blisters when young, becoming rigid and then scaly with age. Like most other true firs, it is thinned barked and therefore very sensitive to fire. Control of fires in the drier southern parts of the northwest has allowed a widespread increase of grand fir over the last 50 years.
  9. Italian Cypress<br>Cupressus sempervirens: With its narrow columnar habit of growth, this evergreen forms tall green columns in the landscape. It gives height to foundation plantings without taking up a lot of room. When planted together, two to three feet apart, these columnar trees form a dense screen. The scale-like leaves lend a very fine texture to the landscape. Italian Cypress can even be planted in pots to add elegance to your patio or front entrance.
  10. Mountain Hemlock<br>Tsuga metensiana: Native to high mountains, from Alaska south through higher Sierra Nevada in California to northern Idaho, Montana. Good for large rock gardens, containers & bonsai.
  11. Norway Spruce<br>Picea Abies ‘norway spruce’: The Norway Spruce can grow 2-3+ feet per year their first 25 years under good conditions, in heavy or poor soils they may average 1 foot per year. Soil, moisture, and adequate sunshine is everything to a plant and its growth rate. On a perfect weather year we have seen over 6 ft of growth in one year! This spruce if given sufficient room to grow will easily grow to over 100 feet tall and be 40 feet wide with spreading branches at the base and will live over 100 years.
  12. Hinoki Japanese Maple Sequoia
  13. abiesndl(concolor)
  14. Boxed Weeping Alaskans
  15. Cedar Foliage
  16. Columnar Long Needle
  17. Contorted Pine
  18. Contorted Pine
  19. Emerald Pine Field
  20. Emerald Green 9\'
  21. Deodar Cedar
  22. Hinoki
  23. Holly Berry
  24. International with Cedars
  25. Large Evergreen Magnolia
  26. Poodle Pine
  27. Sequoia Weeping
  28. Thuja plicata excelsa
  29. Umbrella Pine
  30. Austrian Pine<br>Pinus nigra The Austrian Pine is a dependable pine for Pacific Northwest. It is densely pyramidal when young but matures to be a dome shaped tree with dense spreading branches. Austrian pines can be used as screening trees but they do not tolerate shearing.
  31. Deodora Cedar<br>Cedrus deodora The Deodar Cedar has a very graceful habit that can be quite striking in the landscape. It is grown easily in our mild northwest climate. Branches of the Deodar are pendulous and the central leader often droops. It has dense evergreen needles that grow in tufts or whorls on the branches. Needles have a unique bright green to a bluish tint.
  32. Douglas Fir<br>Pseudotsuga menziesii The Douglas fir is a dense evergreen native to our area. It has a strong pyramidal shape when young and has a tendency to limb itself up as it matures. Its size will be difficult to control in urban landscapes so it is best to have adequate space for this large native tree. Needles are soft and occasionally have a bluish tint.
  33. Elegans Japanese Cedar<br>Cryptomeria Elegans ‘elegans japanese cedar’ Cryptomeria is a selection with juvenile foliage, which is more needle-like and softer, hence the common name plume cedar. The foliage is green in summer and with the onset of cold weather turns a mahogany, plum in the late autumn and winter. It is the perfect backdrop to witchhazels, and red and yellow stemmed cornus. As a young plant is excellent in containers, particularly larger containers planted for winter. The soft texture combines well with other conifers that might be more stiff in appearance also good with Japanese maples. This cultivar was introduced from Japan in the mid 1800s.
  34. Frasier Fir<br>Abies fraseri The Fraser fir is a nice ornamental evergreen for the landscape. It has the classic evergreen look with its dark green needles and layered branching. The Fraser fir is a popular choice at Christmas. It is best in full sun and it prefers a well drained soil. This tree grows in a pyramidal form. The needles are dark green above with silvery-white on the underside.
  35. Giant Sequoia<br>Sequoiadendron giganteum The Giant Sequoia is an impressive addition to any landscape. It grows to magnificent heights and gains enormous trunk girth. A large landscape is necessary because size will be difficult to control. The giant sequoia is extremely long lived and is highly regarded as one of the most majestic trees.
  36. Golden Cedar<br>Thuja plicata \'aurea\' The golden cedar is a variegated type of the western red cedar. It has bands of golden yellow within the green foliage. The golden yellow color is more prominent in the new growth, which occurs in early to mid summer. The golden cedar works well as a landscape accent or as a screening tree. It can also be sheared into hedge form.
  37. Grand Fir<br>‘abies grandis’ The grand fir is one of the tallest firs, reaching heights of 300 feet. It is easily distinguished from other Pacific Northwest firs by its sprays of lustrous needles in two distinct rows. They are usually horizontally spread so that both the upper and lower sides of the branches are clearly visible. The needles are 1 to 1 1/2 inches long with glossy dark green tops and two highly visible white lines of stomata on the undersides. The pollen strobili are yellowish and the cones are yellowish-green to green, cylindrical, erect, 2 to 4 inches long, occur high in the crowns and dissipate in the fall to release their seeds. The bark is grayish-brown, usually with white mottles, smooth with resin blisters when young, becoming rigid and then scaly with age. Like most other true firs, it is thinned barked and therefore very sensitive to fire. Control of fires in the drier southern parts of the northwest has allowed a widespread increase of grand fir over the last 50 years.
  38. Italian Cypress<br>Cupressus sempervirens With its narrow columnar habit of growth, this evergreen forms tall green columns in the landscape. It gives height to foundation plantings without taking up a lot of room. When planted together, two to three feet apart, these columnar trees form a dense screen. The scale-like leaves lend a very fine texture to the landscape. Italian Cypress can even be planted in pots to add elegance to your patio or front entrance.
  39. Mountain Hemlock<br>Tsuga metensiana Native to high mountains, from Alaska south through higher Sierra Nevada in California to northern Idaho, Montana. Good for large rock gardens, containers & bonsai.
  40. Norway Spruce<br>Picea Abies ‘norway spruce’ The Norway Spruce can grow 2-3+ feet per year their first 25 years under good conditions, in heavy or poor soils they may average 1 foot per year. Soil, moisture, and adequate sunshine is everything to a plant and its growth rate. On a perfect weather year we have seen over 6 ft of growth in one year! This spruce if given sufficient room to grow will easily grow to over 100 feet tall and be 40 feet wide with spreading branches at the base and will live over 100 years.